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Engraving Your Medical Alert Bracelet

  
  
  


medical ID tagsEvery day, we talk to dozens of wonderful Lauren's Hope customers who need help engraving their medical alert jewelry. For some, choosing the right medical ID is the hard part because there are just so many fun options! But many of our customers have a hard time fitting all of their pertinent information on their medical ID tags, and people are sometimes overwhelmed by all the options. So today, we're doing a little Engraving 101. Here we go!

What is Rotary Engraving?

What we call standard, traditional, or rotary engraving is what most people think of when they consider engraving. With most of our ID tags, this results in a silver on silver tone, achieved when our engraving machine essentially carves the letters into the metal. 

What is Laser Engraving?

With laser engraving, there is no contact between an engraving tip and the tag. In this instance, a laser actually burns the text onto the tag itself. We use laser engraving when we do color-fill, also called black-fill, orders. Laser engraving with black-fill results in black lettering on our tags that really stands out and can greatly increase the ease of reading.

What Do I Really Need To Engrave On My Medical Alert?

When engraving medical alert jewelry, it's very important to remember that the person reading your medical alert bracelet or necklace will likely never have met you and will know nothing about you. If you've been in an accident or other emergency, you may not have your wallet or purse close at hand, so all of the essentials need to be accessible on your medical ID tag. So we recommend the following:

1. Your full name: If there's room after your name, consider using the rest of the line. For example, "JOE SMITH - 4/11/85" or, "JANE SMITH - NKDA" (NKDA stands for No Known Drug Allergies, and it is a very common medical abbreviation that communicates extremely helpful information). 

medical ID tag with laser engraving2. Your chief medical condition(s): Many common medical conditions have abbreviations that EMTs and other first responders know well. If you're not sure about yours, reach out to us, or check out our common abbreviations list. Also, if you find that your engraving is just a character or two over the limit, give us a call. Sometimes, we can make it fit, depending on the letters/characters involved. For example, "Adrenal Insufficiency" takes up 21 characters, one more than our standard 20, but it will fit on our typical medical ID tags. 

3. Your allergies or medications: Often, people will simply engrave the name of a medication, such as, "Hydrocodone," or "Immitrex." This does not tell rescue personnel whether you are taking these medications regularly or if you are allergic to them. So it's important to make that distinction: "On Hydrocodone," or "Algy Immitrex." Otherwise, an EMT may assume you are allergic to a medication, when actually you are taking it, which could result in drug interactions or medications being withheld that should actually be administered.

Atrial Fibrillation

A-Fib

Allergy/Allergic To

ALGY

Aortic Valve Replacement

AVR

Aspirin

ASA

Blood Pressure

BP

Cancer

CA

Chronic Kidney Disease

CKD

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

COPD

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

CAH

Congestive Heart Failure

CHF

Coronary Artery Disease

CAD

Coronary Heart Disease

CHD

Cystic Fibrosis

CF

Deep Vein Thrombosis

DVT

Defibrillate/Defibrillation

DEFIB

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

DKA

Diabetes Mellitus

DM

Diagnosis or Disease

DX/DIAG

Discontinue

D/C

Do Not Resuscitate

DNR

Epinephrine

EPI

Epinephrine Pen (auto-injector)

EPIPEN

Erythromycin Ethylsuccinate

EES

History

HX

Hypertension

HTN

In Case of Emergency

ICE

Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

IDDM

Intravenous

IV

Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

ITP

Medication(s)/Prescription(s)

MED/MEDS/RX/RXS

Mitral Valve Prolapsed

MVP

Nasogastric

NG

No Known Allergies

NKA

No Known Drug Allergies (used for people who have known non-drug allergies but no known allergies to medications)

NKDA

Penicillin

PCN

Tetracycline

TCN

Tracheal/Tracheotomy

TRACH

Transplant or Treatment

TX (requires context)

Von Willebrand’s Disease

VWD

4. Your emergency contact information: Typically, engraving the word, "ICE" before a phone number is sufficient here. There is no reason to designate that the ICE (In Case of Emergency) contact is your mom or that her name is Janice, as she can explain that if she gets a call. Instead, save those extra characters for your medical information. If you have enough space, having an extra ICE contact is always a great idea. The only time we recommend including a name is when you list someone's work phone number, so the EMTs will know who to ask for.

Our standard medical alert tags have five lines for you to work with, and with a few abbreviations, most customers are easily able to fit their most pertinent medical information on their tags. Do you have engraving questions? Give us a call between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, central time at 1.800.360.8680. 




Comments

It get a lot of comments on my Laurens Hope bracelet. People think just a regular bracelet. Until I show them the I'd part.
Posted @ Wednesday, January 15, 2014 7:34 PM by Carmen Mendoza
Thanks for posting, Carmen! It's so nice to have a bracelet you need to wear be one you truly enjoy wearing!
Posted @ Thursday, January 16, 2014 11:27 AM by Tara Cohen
I just bought my first bracelet. For years my Dr has bugged me to wear one but most are ug. His nurse just showed me this site and I can't wait. I got seaside its so pretty
Posted @ Saturday, January 18, 2014 2:25 PM by cheryl
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